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Above the 20 inches of blown cellulose ultra-efficient attic insulation, Near Zero Maine installed a walkway in the attic to provide easy access to electric wiring.
Adhesive caulk is used to seal seams and attach the multiple layers of rigid insulation
Advanced framing details include corners that are constructed with fewer studs or studs aligned so that insulation can be installed in the corner.
Advanced framing details include framing aligned to allow for insulation at interior-exterior wall intersections.
Advanced framing details include insulated headers over windows and doors.
Advanced framing details include minimal framing at windows and doors.
Advanced framing details include using the minimum amount of wall studs permitted by code.
Advanced framing details throughout house including insulated and open headers
Advanced framing details throughout house limit use of lumber
Advanced framing showing open headers
Advanced framing techniques including 2x6 walls spaced at 24 inches on center and ladder blocking at wall intersections allow more space for insulation in the wall cavities while open-web floor joists provide space between floors for ducting.
Advanced framing uses less wall studs
After all holes through the ceiling are air sealed and the baffles have been installed, the insulation can be installed
After attaching netting to the 2x6 studs, workers fill the wall cavities with R-23 of blown fiberglass made from recycled bottles.
After installing the house wrap over the SIPS, window flashing is installed
After securing the inner coil, cover the draw band and the seam with a generous amount of mastic
After setting precast concrete basement walls on an 8-inch bed of trap rock, this builder sprayed 2 inches of closed-cell spray foam directly onto the ground then laid piping for radiant floor heating before pouring the concrete floor slab.
After spraying the 2x6 wall cavities with 2 inches (R-13) of closed-cell spray foam, the walls are covered with netting and an additional 3.5 inches of fiberglass (R-13) is blown in.
Air barrier is continuous across several components of the lower section of wall
Air flow is produced when central HVAC fan is energized (set thermostat to “fan”)
Air handler platforms used as return air plenums can draw air from vented attics and crawlspaces through other connected framing cavities
Air inlet is located in a convenient place for homeowner to clean
Air inlet is not convenient for cleaning and located next to exhaust outlets
Air seal above-grade sill plates adjacent to conditioned space to minimize air leakage.
Air seal and insulate around the exhaust fan with a rigid foam box
Air seal and insulate double-walls that are half-height or full-height walls used as architectural features in homes.
Air seal and insulate drawer and closet boxes in attic kneewalls
Air seal and insulate flex ducts
Air seal and insulate light tube
Air seal and insulate the rim and band joists of walls separating an attached garage from the home’s conditioned space.
Air seal around all duct shafts and flues installed through ceilings, walls, or flooring to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal around all plumbing and piping installed through walls, ceilings, and flooring to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal around all wiring installed through walls, ceilings, and flooring to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal around kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal around recessed can light fixtures installed through ceilings to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal attic access panels and drop-down stairs to minimize air leakage.
Air seal door and window rough openings with backer rod, caulk, or nonexpanding foam
Air seal drywall to top plates at all attic/wall interfaces to minimize air leakage.
Air seal exterior doors to minimize air leakage.
Air seal floor joist cavities under kneewall with rigid foam, plywood, or OSB caulked in place
Air seal rough opening from inside
Air seal the attic access panel with weather stripping
Air seal the attic access pull-down stairs opening with weather stripping
Air seal the attic kneewall door opening with weather stripping
Air seal the common wall between units in a multi-family structure to minimize air leakage.
Air seal the electrical panel
Air seal the floor above a garage when there is living space above the garage and make sure floor insulation is in full contact with the underside of the subfloor.
Air seal the floor above an unconditioned basement or crawlspace and make sure floor insulation is in full contact with the underside of the subfloor.
Air seal the rough opening around doors and windows to minimize air leakage.
Air seal the top, bottom, and sides of a cantilevered floor cavity and ensure that insulation is in full contact with all sides without voids.
Air seal whole-house fans to minimize air leakage.
Air sealing behind a staircase
Air sealing tape seals all wood-to-wood joints in the attic.
Air-sealing tape carefully seals the seams around the window framing.
Air-tight electrical boxes have built-in gaskets and self-sealing wire holes
All ceiling, wall, floor, and slab insulation shall achieve RESNET-defined Grade I installation
All ENERGY STAR-qualified windows display the ENERGY STAR label
All of the ductwork for the efficient (8.5 HSPF, 15 SEER) heat pump is mastic sealed and installed in conditioned space.
All of the exhaust fans are wired to one labeled switch at the electrical panel
All of the pipes are insulated on this high-efficiency 50-gallon heat pump water heater.
All other supply ducts and all return ducts in unconditioned space have insulation ≥ R-6
All return air and mechanically supplied outdoor air pass through filter prior to conditioning
All seams are caulked to completely air seal the subfloor of the cantilever
All seams between structural insulated panels (SIPs) foamed and/or taped per manufacturer's instructions
All vents are routed to gable walls and eaves rather than through the roof to minimize the risk of leaks and provide an uninterrupted plane for PV panels.
Allow two to three feet of straight duct run from the fan exhaust port to the first elbow
An active radon fan helps pull radon out of the home’s basement.
An all-terrain forklift is used to move and stage the panels
An array of 13.4 kW of solar panels form a waterproof roof for this porch that allows 15% of sunlight to filter through while the dual-surface panels produce power from the top and from any sunlight reflected up onto their lower surface.
An electronic controller operates an exhaust fan, a mechanical damper on a fresh air intake, and the central heat pump’s fan, which draws in fresh air through the damper and distributes it in sync with exhaust fan operation for balanced fresh air.
An energy monitoring system helps the homeowners track energy usage and solar power production.
An energy rater uses a duct blower to test HVAC duct air leakage.
An energy recovery ventilator draws in fresh outside air that is filtered and circulated by the central air handler, while stale air from central returns is routed through the ERV to exchange heat before being exhausted outside.
An energy recovery ventilator provides filtered fresh air to every room in the house.
An energy recovery ventilator with a MERV 13 filter supplies clean, fresh air to the entire home.
An ERV provides fresh air to the home while removing stale air and recovering heat.
An HRV or ERV provides balanced ventilation
An insulated spline is another option for avoiding thermal bridging at SIP panel seams

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