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A fresh air inlet is ducted to the return side of the home’s central air handler; a motorized damper and electronic controls help balance the flow of fresh incoming air with controlled exhaust to meet ventilation requirements
A rigid metal duct vents the exhaust fan.
At the outlet of the dryer exhaust duct, install a hooded vent with a louvered damper
Back-draft damper still has a piece of tape that prevented it from rattling during shipping
Bathrooms should be equipped with an exhaust fan that vents directly outdoors
CFM rating may not meet the performance specification once installed
CFM rating may not meet the performance specification once installed
Clothes dryers vented directly to outdoors, except for ventless dryers equipped with a condensate drain
Common exhaust duct not shared by fans in separate dwellings
Continuously-operating ventilation & exhaust fans include readily accessible override controls
Dryer exhaust duct should vent directly to the exterior via a smooth, rigid metal duct
Dryer exhaust line terminates in the crawlspace
Dryer vent is run vertical with a 90 degree bend and does not vent to the outside
Dryer vents directly to the outdoors
Dryer vents directly to the outdoors
Exhaust duct has been mechanically fastened and sealed with mastic
Exhaust duct only mechanically fastened and not sealed
Exhaust duct work and penetration to the exterior have been sealed with mastic
Exhaust duct work and penetration to the exterior have not been sealed
Exhaust fan terminates to the outside
Exhaust fans in separate dwelling units should not share a common exhaust
Exhaust has been properly installed, sealed, and terminates to outdoors
Fan CFM rating is higher than the requirement increasing the likelihood that it will meet the performance level once installed
Fan CFM rating is higher than the requirement increasing the likelihood that it will meet the performance level once installed
Fan exhaust ducts vent out through the soffit vent.
Fan shares exhaust and does not have dack-draft damper installed
Fan shares exhaust and has a back-draft damper installed
Fans from seperate dwellings exhausted together without back-draft dampers and not sealed
If fans share common exhaust duct, back-draft dampers installed
Kitchens should be equipped with an exhaust fan that vents directly outdoors
Manufacturer’s label found on this exhaust fan housing shows a sone rating of 2.5
Override control switches centrally located near thermostat for ease of access
Packing tape has been removed and damper will be able to function properly once fan is installed
Recirculating fan installed that does not exhaust to outside
Separate exhaust fans can share a common exhaust if each exhaust fan is equipped with a back-draft damper to prevent cross contamination
Seperate dwellings with their own seperate exhaust terminations
The back-draft damper on this exhaust fan is closed to prevent cross contamination
The back-draft damper on this exhaust fan is open when the exhaust fan is operating
The back-draft damper open when the fan is actively exhausting and closes when the fan is off
The ENERGY STAR logo on the manufacturer’s label indicates this is an ENERGY STAR qualifying exhaust fan
The manufacturer’s label found on this exhaust fan housing shows a sone rating of 1.0
This HRV, installed in a conditioned attic, provides balanced ventilation to the whole home
Two exhaust terminations, joined in a roughly cut, restrictive hole and not air sealed
Wrong – Overly powerful kitchen exhaust fans can backdraft other combustion appliances in the home
Wrong – These flex ducts are pulled taut, which is correct but they are inadequately supported with straps that are spaced too far apart and are too tight causing pinching of the insulation and turns are sharp rather than gradual.