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Image Gallery

A second layer of rigid insulation is installed over the 2 in. by 4 in. retaining strip
A technician conducts a duct blaster test
Air seal around all duct shafts and flues installed through ceilings, walls, or flooring to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
All of the ductwork for the efficient (8.5 HSPF, 15 SEER) heat pump is mastic sealed and installed in conditioned space.
Assembled section of fiber board duct
Boot has been covered with insulation and sealed with mastic
Boot to drywall connection not sealed
Boot to drywall connection sealed
Boot to floor connection not sealed
Boot to floor connection sealed
Connection in place but not sealed
Cut fiber board with a red V-groove tool and a gray shiplap tool to create mitered corners and a shiplapped edge for duct sections
Duct boots sealed to floor, wall or ceiling using caulk, foam, mastic tape or mastic paste
Duct insulation is installed over boot
Fiber board sheets are available with pre-cut shiplapped ends
Fiberglass duct board typically comes in sheets 4 foot wide by 10 foot long
Form a sheet metal shield around the flue pipe
Form sheet metal shield around pipe keeping 3-inch clearance
Hand tools for cutting fiber board sheets include a knife, straight edge, and color-coded edge-cutting tools
Install wood framing cross pieces in the attic rafter bays on each side of the duct chase
Insulation does not cover boot and is not sealed
Insulation does not cover boot and is not sealed
Mechanically fastened and sealed
Prepare chase with adhesive for bottom insulation
Raised ceiling chase sealed with drywall mud
Rater-measured duct leakage to outdoors ≤ 4 CFM25 per 100 sq. ft. of conditioned floor area
Right – Chase capped with rigid air barrier and duct work penetrations properly sealed
Right – Duct register is mastic sealed to framing
Right – Flex duct connection to trunk duct is properly sealed
Right – Flex duct is mastic sealed at junction box
Right – Flex duct is properly connected to metal duct with a duct tie and connection is mastic sealed
Right – Flex duct register is mastic sealed to framing
Right – Metal duct boot is properly sealed at seams
Right – Metal is mechanically fastened at junction
Right – Metal or fiberboard duct is mastic sealed at junction with duct register box
Right – Metal or fiberboard duct is mastic sealed at seams
Right – Neatly cut and sealed penetration
Right – Penetrations have been neatly cut and properly sealed with foam
Right – Vent and air barrier sealed
Right – Spray foam air seals and insulates raised ceiling duct chase
Run-out duct is sealed with mastic
Seal all wood framing joints surrounding the chase with sealant and lay a bead of sealant along top edge of chase framing
Seal all wood framing joints surrounding the chase with sealant and lay a bead of sealant on top edge of chase framing
Seal bottom layer of rigid insulation with adhesive, tape and nails
Seal seams in fiber board ducts with out-clinching staples, UL-181A-approved tape, and mastic
Second layer of rigid insulation is adhered with foam
Sheet metal and mastic provide air sealing around a flue pipe.
Spray foam air seals gaps around holes and drywall-to-top plate seams.
Spray foam air seals the boot to the ceiling
Spray foam insulation used for raised ceiling duct chase
Spray foam insulation used for raised ceiling duct chase.
The duct sealing spray injection system includes a blower/heater (background) and the sealant injection unit (foreground)
The duct tester and blower door are set up to measure leakage to the outdoors
The joints in the ducts and air handler are sealed with mastic.
The seams in this HVAC duct are sealed with mastic.
Total Rater-measured duct leakage ≤ 8 CFM25 per 100 sq. ft. of conditioned area
Wrong – Chase not capped
Wrong – Fibrous insulation does not air seal
Wrong – Penetration hole is larger than duct and not sealed
Wrong – Vent sleeve not completely sealed
Wrong- A tie strap should not be used over the duct outer liner because it can compress the insulation. Tuck in the fibrous insulation and seal the outer liner to the connecting duct with mastic or foil tape (Steven Winter Associates 2013).

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