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A site-built rafter roof with a raised top plate allows for more insulation underneath
After all holes through the ceiling are air sealed and the baffles have been installed, the insulation can be installed
Baffles provide an air space over the insulation to guide ventilation air from the soffit vents up along the underside of the roof deck
Because all of the structural load is carried by the SIP roof and wall panels, no trusses are needed, allowing the home to have vaulted ceilings and open interiors throughout.
Cut a neat hole in the ceiling with smooth edges in which the exhaust fan housing will fit snugly
Dropped hallway ceiling duct chase with drywalled soffit
Dropped hallway ceiling with drywall
Finished raised ceiling duct chase
Install a continuous air barrier below or above ceiling insulation and install wind baffles.
Install a sealed enclosure over a non-IC rated recessed light fixture to air seal the can and to prevent insulation from touching the recessed can light.
Install an air barrier over dropped ceilings or soffits
Install duct supports in line with ceiling trusses
Installing a soffit in an exterior wall
Installing air barrier above a soffit
Modified truss to allow for raised ceiling sections for ducts
Raised ceiling duct chase installation technique
Raised ceiling duct chase is not visible as finished product
Raised heel, energy trusses extend further past the wall and are deeper at the wall allowing room for full insulation coverage over the top plate of the exterior walls
Right – Air barrier is present between the dropped ceiling/soffit and the attic
Right – Air barrier is present between the dropped ceiling/soffit and the attic
Right – Seams and penetrations of air barrier properly sealed
Right – The insulating enclosure over this non-IC rated recessed light fixture is centered and air sealed.
Right – The top of the enclosure over this recessed can light remains clear of attic insulation
Right – Wind baffle installation maintains necessary code clearance between baffle and roof deck
Right – Wind baffle installation will allow proper insulation depth over the top plate
Right-- IR photo shows how effectively spray foam insulated/air sealed attic kneewall and the floor cavities under kneewall
Spray foam insulates the top plates and air seals them to the ventilation baffles before ceiling drywall is installed.
Spray foam insulation air seals and insulates the floor above the garage.
Spray foam insulation used for raised ceiling duct chase
Spray foam insulation used for raised ceiling duct chase.
Standard 2 in. by 4 in. stud secures duct chase - made of rigid insulation in this example
The builder installed plywood under the roof rafters and air sealed it with tape then added a dropped ceiling with metal framing to provide a service cavity for ducts and wiring, without poking holes in the air barrier.
The builder installed this OSB under the roof rafters and air sealed the seams with tape then added a dropped drywall ceiling to provide a service cavity for ducts and wiring, while minimizing holes into the attic.
The ceiling drywall is sealed to the top plates with caulk.
The drywall above the dropped ceiling duct chase extends beyond adjoining top plates for a continuous air barrier
The floor cavities under this attic kneewall are completely open to the unconditioned attic space and a prime target for wind washing.
The HVAC ducts are located inside the home in a dropped ceiling chase in a central hallway, which provides conditioned space for the ducts and short duct runs for more efficient delivery.
The rim joists and top plates are air sealed and insulated with open-cell spray foam while the walls are filled with blown fiberglass.
The seams in the ceiling drywall are sealed from the attic side with spray foam.
The soffit dam and baffle allow air to flow through the vents without disturbing the insulation covering the top plates
The unvented attic is insulated along the underside of the roof deck with 7 inches (R-49) of closed-cell spray foam, providing vaulted ceilings and a conditioned knee wall space for ducting.
The walls and ceilings of this post-and-beam home are filled with netted blown fiberglass.
This builder applied an air-sealing layer of spray foam along the underside of the roof deck and the inside of the walls before filling the wall cavities with blown cellulose.
This vaulted ceiling has 7 inches of closed-cell spray foam plus an R-22 unfaced mineral wool batt for a total attic insulation value of R-68.
Wrong – Ceiling insulation not completely installed/air barrier missing
Wrong – Insulation is in direct contact with this non-insulation contact (IC)-rated recessed light fixture
Wrong – No air barrier is present between the dropped ceiling/soffit and the attic
Wrong – No air barrier is present between the dropped ceiling/soffit and the attic
Wrong – Seams of air barrier not sealed
Wrong – Seams of air barrier not sealed
Wrong – Wind baffle installation will not allow insulation over the top plate