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A push button operates the on-demand hot water circulation pump in this master bathroom.
Air seal and insulate around the exhaust fan with a rigid foam box
Air seal around kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Allow two to three feet of straight duct run from the fan exhaust port to the first elbow
Bathroom exhaust fan can vent out through the wall or up through the roof
Bathrooms should be equipped with an exhaust fan that vents directly outdoors
Build an air-tight rigid box to cover the exhaust fan
Caulk or foam seal between the exhaust fan housing and the ceiling gypsum; install a gasket or caulk around the exterior exhaust duct vent
Cement board installed to a shower surround
Cement board installed to a tub surround
CFM rating may not meet the performance specification once installed
Cover the box with insulation
Draft stopping and air barrier at tub enclosure − plan view
Draft stopping and air barrier at tub enclosure − side view
EPA WaterSense-certified faucets help reduce hot water usage.
EPA WaterSense-certified showerheads help reduce hot water usage.
EPA WaterSense-certified toilets help reduce hot water usage.
Exhaust duct has been mechanically fastened and sealed with mastic
Exhaust duct only mechanically fastened and not sealed
Exhaust has been properly installed, sealed, and terminates to outdoors
Exhaust pipe should be made of smooth, rigid duct and any bends should be gradual, not sharp
Fan CFM rating is higher than the requirement increasing the likelihood that it will meet the performance level once installed
Install an air barrier behind showers and tubs installed on exterior walls.
Install cement board behind tub and shower enclosures.
Install the fan either in the range hood, the cabinet above the stove, or on the wall above the stove
Moisture-resistant rigid foam insulation was installed to provide a continuous air and thermal barrier behind the tub-shower insert.
Proper sizing for kitchen exhaust fan
Right –  Rigid air barrier is installed behind fireplace
Right –  Rigid air barrier is installed behind fireplace
Right – Air barrier installed behind shower stall
Right – Air barrier installed behind the tub
Right – Air barrier sealed
Right – Cleanly cut and properly sized hole
Right – Fan with a cleanly cut and properly sized hole has been air sealed to drywall
Right – Foam board taped at seams installed behind shower enclosure
Right – Insulation meets RESNET Grade I prior to air barrier installation
Right – Kitchen exhaust penetration has been sealed with caulk
Right – Moisture-resistant backing material has been used above the tub enclosure
Solid wood blocking was installed in the walls to accommodate future grab bars in both bathrooms.
The exhaust fan housing may have holes that allow conditioned air to leak into the attic
The gap around this kitchen exhaust duct represents a significant source of air leakage to the unconditioned attic
This bathroom is handicapped accessible with a zero-entry shower and roll-up sinks.
This builder installs spray foam in exterior wall cavities where tubs and showers will be installed to air seal and insulate the exterior wall.
This home is piped with an insulated hot water recirculation loop that speeds hot water to each fixture while helping to reduce water waste.
Two exhaust terminations, joined in a roughly cut, restrictive hole and not air sealed
Vent the kitchen fan exhaust directly to the outside, not into an attic, crawlspace, or space between floors
Wrong –  No rigid air barrier is installed behind fireplace
Wrong – Air barrier missing behind tub area
Wrong – Air barrier missing behind tub area
Wrong – Air barrier missing behind tub area
Wrong – Air barrier not sealed
Wrong – Insulation has compression and misalignment
Wrong – Kitchen exhaust has not been air sealed
Wrong – No air barrier installed prior to tub installation
Wrong – No air barrier installed prior to tub installation
Wrong – No backing installed behind shower enclosure
Wrong – Roughly cut hole that is larger than the fan, making it difficult to seal
Wrong – Roughly cut hole that is larger than the fan, making it difficult to seal