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Image Gallery

A builder, energy efficiency consultant, and crew supervisor inspect a spray foam installation.
A manometer is used to measure pressure differentials between indoors and outdoors when testing whole-house air leakage.
A putty knife is used to press caulk into a seam in the plywood sheathing.
A second layer of rigid insulation is installed over the 2 in. by 4 in. retaining strip
A sill-sealing foam gasket is placed under 8-inch plywood base and two beads of caulk air seal the 2x6 sill plate to it; two more beads of caulk will top the 2x6 which will serve as a spline for the SIP wall panel.
A technician conducts a duct blaster test
A termite shield and a sill gasket are installed between the sill plate and the foundation on a raised slab foundation
Adhesive caulk is used to seal seams and attach the multiple layers of rigid insulation
Air seal above-grade sill plates adjacent to conditioned space to minimize air leakage.
Air seal and insulate drawer and closet boxes in attic kneewalls
Air seal and insulate light tube
Air seal around all duct shafts and flues installed through ceilings, walls, or flooring to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal around all plumbing and piping installed through walls, ceilings, and flooring to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal around all wiring installed through walls, ceilings, and flooring to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal around kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal around recessed can light fixtures installed through ceilings to keep conditioned air from leaking into unconditioned space.
Air seal attic access panels and drop-down stairs to minimize air leakage.
Air seal door and window rough openings with backer rod, caulk, or nonexpanding foam
Air seal drywall to top plates at all attic/wall interfaces to minimize air leakage.
Air seal exterior doors to minimize air leakage.
Air seal the attic access panel with weather stripping
Air seal the attic access pull-down stairs opening with weather stripping
Air seal the attic kneewall door opening with weather stripping
Air seal the common wall between units in a multi-family structure to minimize air leakage.
Air seal the rough opening around doors and windows to minimize air leakage.
Air seal whole-house fans to minimize air leakage.
Air sealing tape seals all wood-to-wood joints in the attic.
Air-sealing tape carefully seals the seams around the window framing.
All of the ductwork for the efficient (8.5 HSPF, 15 SEER) heat pump is mastic sealed and installed in conditioned space.
All seams between structural insulated panels (SIPs) foamed and/or taped per manufacturer's instructions
Application of window and door nonexpanding foam sealant
Assembled section of fiber board duct
Balloon-framed walls have no top plate to prevent air flow into wall cavity
Before installing drywall, contractors install two beads of a sprayer-applied elastomeric sealant along framing and top plates to forma a flexible, air-tight seal between the framing and dry wall.
Boot has been covered with insulation and sealed with mastic
Boot to drywall connection not sealed
Boot to drywall connection sealed
Boot to floor connection not sealed
Boot to floor connection sealed
Bottom plate-subfloor joints, corners, and wiring holes are all sealed with foam to improve the air tightness of the homes.
Builders use an infrared camera to “see” heat flow and air leakage around a window during construction.
Caulk applied against the backer rod to seal a window rough opening
Caulk or glue along top plates before installing drywall
Closed-cell backer rod for air sealing window and door rough openings
Common wall sheathing not properly fastened or sealed
Connection in place but not sealed
Cover the roll of fiberglass batt with spray foam to air seal it in place
Cut fiber board with a red V-groove tool and a gray shiplap tool to create mitered corners and a shiplapped edge for duct sections
Duct boots sealed to floor, wall or ceiling using caulk, foam, mastic tape or mastic paste
Duct insulation is installed over boot
Electrical boxes are sealed with air sealing tape.
Exhaust duct is well supported by framing and support straps
Exhaust duct only mechanically fastened and not sealed
Exhaust terminates inside of soffit and was just covered
Exhaust terminates to the outside away from air inlets
Extra-wide air sealing tape seals seam where the structural insulated panels (SIPs) that form the roof and walls meet.
Fiber board sheets are available with pre-cut shiplapped ends
Fiberglass duct board typically comes in sheets 4 foot wide by 10 foot long
Fill in the hole left by the missing top plate with a rigid air blocking material or rolled batt insulation that is spray foamed in place
Foam gasket installed beneath sill plate
Form a sheet metal shield around the flue pipe
Form sheet metal shield around pipe keeping 3-inch clearance
Form sheet metal shield around pipe keeping 3-inch clearance
Gaps at shared common walls can be a significant source of air leakage in multi-family buildings

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